Adolescent Participation in Hazardous Activities: Identifying High Risk Groups and Implications For Intervention Policies



Citation:

William J. Burns (1993) ,"Adolescent Participation in Hazardous Activities: Identifying High Risk Groups and Implications For Intervention Policies", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 20, eds. Leigh McAlister and Michael L. Rothschild, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 176.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 20, 1993      Page 176

ADOLESCENT PARTICIPATION IN HAZARDOUS ACTIVITIES: IDENTIFYING HIGH RISK GROUPS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERVENTION POLICIES

William J. Burns, University of Iowa

 

PAPERS PRESENTED

ADOLESCENT PERCEPTION OF RISK: UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING HIGH RISK BEHAVIOR

Herbert H. Severson, Oregon Research Institute

Adolescent risk perceptions were examined across several studies. The findings indicate that adolescents who engage in high risk behavior perceive the risk to be smaller, better known, and more controllable, and also perceive greater benefits and more peer pressure than non-participants. Hence, risk perception may prove useful in targeting teenagers who are "at risk" of later becoming involved with dangerous activities. Such adolescents may be viable candidates for early intervention programs.

 

PERSONALITY->ATTITUDE->BEHAVIOR: MODELS OF YOUNG MALE ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION

John P. Murry, University of Wisconsin

John L. Lastovicka, Arizona State University

Jon R. Austin, University of Wisconsin

The goal of this modeling was to demonstrate how incorporating the motivational underpinnings of consumption beliefs enriches the cognitive insights found in traditional multiattribute research. For example, the youthful-male alcohol consumption model suggests that alcohol consumption is, in part, a function of "drinking helps socially" and "drinking impairs ability" beliefs. The "drinking impairs ability" belief is influenced by an "aggressive male" trait and the "drinking helps socially" belief is influenced by both "aggressive male" and "satisfaction with life" traits. This implies for instance that an effective strategy to change the "drinking helps socially" belief would be to demonstrate that excessive social drinking detracts from a satisfying life. Consumers often hold consumption beliefs that reflect more enduring beliefs about themselves. Uncovering the relationship between these two types of beliefs begins to address why consumption beliefs are held and suggests how these beliefs can be effectively managed.

 

ALCOHOL-RELATED RISK TAKING AMONG TEENAGERS: AN INVESTIGATION OF CONTRIBUTING FACTORS AND A DISCUSSION OF HOW MARKETING PRINCIPLES CAN HELP

William J. Burns, University of Iowa

Sarah E. Hampson, Oregon Research Institute

Herbert H. Severson, Oregon Research Institute

Paul Slovic, Decision Research

A covariance structure analysis indicated that factors pertaining to perceptions that the benefits of using alcohol outweigh the risks, grade level, and desired independence directly affect participation in alcohol-related activities. Likewise, personality characteristics (sensation seeking, ego control, independence, and academic-orientation) appear to indirectly influence participation through their influence on adolescents' perceptions of the associated risks. These findings are integrated within a social marketing framework and offer strategies to reduce alcohol-related risk taking among adolescents. See our paper in this volume for details.

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Authors

William J. Burns, University of Iowa



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 20 | 1993



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