It Is Up to Who I Am to Spread Positive Or Negative Word of Mouth to My Best Friend

ABSTRACT - Existing theoretical perspectives make conflicting predictions about the interplay of tie strength and valence of experience on WOM transmission propensity. We argue that using the accessible self-construal as a boundary condition can clarify these conflicting views. This paper makes the following theoretical contributions. First, it offers a direct test between the two prevalent competing views on WOM transmission decision. Second, it articulates boundary conditions of these two competing perspectives. Third, it explores whether and when self-focused motivations or other-focused motivations mediate the observed moderating effect of self-construal on the WOM transmission decision.



Citation:

Yinlong Zhang, Lawrence Feick, and Vikas Mittal (2005) ,"It Is Up to Who I Am to Spread Positive Or Negative Word of Mouth to My Best Friend", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 32, eds. Geeta Menon and Akshay R. Rao, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 23-23.

Authors

Yinlong Zhang, The University of Texas at San Antonio
Lawrence Feick, University of Pittsburgh
Vikas Mittal, University of Pittsburgh



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 32 | 2005



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