A Grounded Typology of Consumer Coping Strategies Within the Context of Infertility Treatment

EXTENDED ABSTRACT - In recent years, researchers in consumer behavior have increasingly recognized that people may encounter significant obstacles when attempting to achieve goals related to consumption. One research stream demonstrating the salience of this topic focuses on understanding the coping strategies consumers employ when they experience and attempt to manage negative or mixed emotions in a variety of consumer contexts. Coping has been defined as Aa multidimensional set of cognitions and behaviors called upon to help the person manage or tolerate the demands imposed by chronic or acute stressors.@ (Eckenrode, 1991, p.3).



Citation:

Eileen Fischer, Cele C. Otnes, and Linda Tuncay (2004) ,"A Grounded Typology of Consumer Coping Strategies Within the Context of Infertility Treatment", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31, eds. Barbara E. Kahn and Mary Frances Luce, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 579-579.

Authors

Eileen Fischer, York University
Cele C. Otnes, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Linda Tuncay, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31 | 2004



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