Beyond Polarized Cultural Values a New Approach to the Study of South Korean and Us Newspaper Advertisements

ABSTRACT - This study content-analyzed US and South Korean newspaper ads for the year 2000, to challenge bipolarized cultural value frameworks prevalent in cross-cultural advertising studies and to establish more rigorous methodology. Our multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed that the two-factor model of individualism/collectivism dimension was not equivalent across the two cultures, while the future/past time orientation dimension was comparable. As predicted, both Korean and US ads conveyed more individualistic than collectivistic indicators. In addition, Korean ads were more future-time oriented than the US ads. Findings are discussed in terms of theoretical, methodological and socio-cultural considerations.



Citation:

Hye-Jin Paek, Michelle R. Nelson, and Douglas M. McLeod (2004) ,"Beyond Polarized Cultural Values a New Approach to the Study of South Korean and Us Newspaper Advertisements", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31, eds. Barbara E. Kahn and Mary Frances Luce, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 495-502.

Authors

Hye-Jin Paek, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Michelle R. Nelson, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Douglas M. McLeod, University of Wisconsin-Madison



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31 | 2004



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