Consumer Trust and Distrust in the Food System: Some Implications For the Debates on Food Biotechnologies

ABSTRACT - Biotechnology is considered to be one of the most influential revolutions, one far greater in its potential societal consequences than the computer, electronic or atomic revolutions. As with most revolutions, the public’s view on the risks and benefits of the technology is divided. However, most scholars agree that public trust in social institutions and in the food system would be a central issue to understanding public attitudes toward the risks and benefits of food biotechnologies. To date, the nature of such trust has received little systematic empirical attention. This study provides a detailed look at consumer trust and distrust in social institutions and in food safety system. Theoretical significance and practical (public policy) implications of the findings are also discussed.



Citation:

Ahmet Ekici (2004) ,"Consumer Trust and Distrust in the Food System: Some Implications For the Debates on Food Biotechnologies", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31, eds. Barbara E. Kahn and Mary Frances Luce, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 555-563.

Authors

Ahmet Ekici, Bilkent University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31 | 2004



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

When Waste Costs: The Influence of Price on Consumers’ Perceived Waste and Purchase Intention of an Excessive Amount of Product

Tao Tao, Hong Kong Baptist University
Robert Wyer Jr., University of Cincinnati, USA

Read More

Featured

P1. Constructed Preferences in Time-Money Tradeoffs: Evidence for Greater Violation of Procedural Invariance for Time as Opposed to Money Elicitations

Nazli Gurdamar Okutur, London Business School, UK
Jonathan Zev Berman, London Business School, UK

Read More

Featured

Deny the Voice Inside: Are Accessible Attitudes Always Beneficial?

Aaron Jeffrey Barnes, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Sharon Shavitt, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.