When Counterarguing Fails: Effects on Attitude Strength

EXTENDED ABSTRACT - Popular models of persuasion suggest individuals can process information in either an objective or a biased manner (see Petty & Wegener, 1999). Objective processing is data-driven (i.e., individuals generate whatever thoughts naturally come to mind). Biased processing, however, refers to focusing specifically on either rejecting or accepting a message (e.g., focusing on generating negative or positive thoughts). In the present research, we examine the consequences of biased processing involving a goal to counterargue a message versus a goal to simply think about the message carefully.



Citation:

Derek D. Rucker and Richard. E Petty (2004) ,"When Counterarguing Fails: Effects on Attitude Strength", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31, eds. Barbara E. Kahn and Mary Frances Luce, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 80-81.

Authors

Derek D. Rucker, Ohio State University
Richard. E Petty, Ohio State University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31 | 2004



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