Type of Information Processing in Judging Utilitarian and Expressive Product Attributes

ABSTRACT - In an experimental study, the well-known but not often validated notions are confirmed that consumers judge utilitarian product attributes with the use of analytic information processing and expressive product attributes with the use of holistic information processing. Furthermore, we make an addition to this framework. In some cases, utilitarian attributes are judged on the basis of the overall appearance of a product, with the use of holistic information processing. We found indication that this happens more often for consumers with a relatively low level of product knowledge.



Citation:

Marielle Creusen and Jan Schoormans (2001) ,"Type of Information Processing in Judging Utilitarian and Expressive Product Attributes", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 395.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 395

TYPE OF INFORMATION PROCESSING IN JUDGING UTILITARIAN AND EXPRESSIVE PRODUCT ATTRIBUTES

Marielle Creusen, Delft University of Technology

Jan Schoormans, Delft University of Technology

ABSTRACT -

In an experimental study, the well-known but not often validated notions are confirmed that consumers judge utilitarian product attributes with the use of analytic information processing and expressive product attributes with the use of holistic information processing. Furthermore, we make an addition to this framework. In some cases, utilitarian attributes are judged on the basis of the overall appearance of a product, with the use of holistic information processing. We found indication that this happens more often for consumers with a relatively low level of product knowledge.

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Authors

Marielle Creusen, Delft University of Technology
Jan Schoormans, Delft University of Technology



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28 | 2001



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