Ad Cognitions in Television Ad Processing: the Expectation-Motivation-Matching Model (E3m)

ABSTRACT - In the Expectation-Motivation-Matching Model (E3M), the authors propose a conceptualization of ad processing including antecedents of ad cognitionsB1) product interest, and 2) schemas for ads of a product category. Such schemas include expectations for ad themes to be used, and expectations for feelings to be experienced during television ad viewing. The E3M also includes a richer operationalization of ad cognitions using the constructs of 1) motivations and 2) the matching of the ad with viewer expectations for television ads of the product category. The E3M receives empirical support through large-scale ad pre-testing and structural equation modeling.



Citation:

Mark Peterson and Naresh Malhotra (2001) ,"Ad Cognitions in Television Ad Processing: the Expectation-Motivation-Matching Model (E3m)", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 393.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 393

AD COGNITIONS IN TELEVISION AD PROCESSING: THE EXPECTATION-MOTIVATION-MATCHING MODEL (E3M)

Mark Peterson, University of Texas at Arlington

Naresh Malhotra, Georgia Tech

ABSTRACT -

In the Expectation-Motivation-Matching Model (E3M), the authors propose a conceptualization of ad processing including antecedents of ad cognitionsB1) product interest, and 2) schemas for ads of a product category. Such schemas include expectations for ad themes to be used, and expectations for feelings to be experienced during television ad viewing. The E3M also includes a richer operationalization of ad cognitions using the constructs of 1) motivations and 2) the matching of the ad with viewer expectations for television ads of the product category. The E3M receives empirical support through large-scale ad pre-testing and structural equation modeling.

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Authors

Mark Peterson, University of Texas at Arlington
Naresh Malhotra, Georgia Tech



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28 | 2001



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