Consumer Vengeance: Getting Even At the Expense of Getting a Good Deal

ABSTRACT - This paper introduces the concept of consumer vengeance. Consumer vengeance is conceptualized as the desire of decision makers to Aget even@ with an entity, such as a firm, in response to a perceived wrongdoing. A theoretical framework is proposed for understanding variables that influence the extent to which consumer vengeance is felt and the conditions under which one acts on such feelings. The results of two experiments, in purchasing and voting contexts, are reported. These studies examine how feelings of consumer vengeance impact the choice process in competitive contexts, and whether, given sufficient feelings of vengeance, such choices can result in suboptimal decisions. We also examine conditions under which consumers might choose not to act on their feelings of vengeance. Implications of the research are discussed.



Citation:

Nada Nasr Bechwati and Maureen Morrin (2001) ,"Consumer Vengeance: Getting Even At the Expense of Getting a Good Deal", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 373.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 373

CONSUMER VENGEANCE: GETTING EVEN AT THE EXPENSE OF GETTING A GOOD DEAL

Nada Nasr Bechwati, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Maureen Morrin, University of Pittsburgh

ABSTRACT -

This paper introduces the concept of consumer vengeance. Consumer vengeance is conceptualized as the desire of decision makers to "get even" with an entity, such as a firm, in response to a perceived wrongdoing. A theoretical framework is proposed for understanding variables that influence the extent to which consumer vengeance is felt and the conditions under which one acts on such feelings. The results of two experiments, in purchasing and voting contexts, are reported. These studies examine how feelings of consumer vengeance impact the choice process in competitive contexts, and whether, given sufficient feelings of vengeance, such choices can result in suboptimal decisions. We also examine conditions under which consumers might choose not to act on their feelings of vengeance. Implications of the research are discussed.

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Authors

Nada Nasr Bechwati, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Maureen Morrin, University of Pittsburgh



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28 | 2001



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