Gender Differences in the Risk Perceptions and Effectiveness of Risk Reducers in Online Purchasing

ABSTRACT - This paper examines how men and women differ in both their perceptions of the risks associated with shopping online and the effectiveness of various risk reducers. The first study examines how gender affects the perceptions of the probability of negative outcomes and the severity of such negative outcomes should they occur for five risks associated with buying online (i.e., credit card misuse, fraudulent sites, loss of privacy, shipping problems, and product failure).



Citation:

Ellen Garbarino and Michal Strahilevitz (2001) ,"Gender Differences in the Risk Perceptions and Effectiveness of Risk Reducers in Online Purchasing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 99.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 99

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN THE RISK PERCEPTIONS AND EFFECTIVENESS OF RISK REDUCERS IN ONLINE PURCHASING

Ellen Garbarino, Case Western Reserve University

Michal Strahilevitz, University of Arizona

ABSTRACT -

This paper examines how men and women differ in both their perceptions of the risks associated with shopping online and the effectiveness of various risk reducers. The first study examines how gender affects the perceptions of the probability of negative outcomes and the severity of such negative outcomes should they occur for five risks associated with buying online (i.e., credit card misuse, fraudulent sites, loss of privacy, shipping problems, and product failure).

The second study examines gender differences in the effectiveness of 33 risk reducers. The third study experimentally tests whether women’s willingness to purchase online is more strongly affected by recommendations from friends than men’s. The results suggest that, even when controlling for differences in Internet usage, women perceive a higher level of risk in online purchasing than men do. In addition, having a site recommended by a friend leads to a stronger increase in willingness to buy online among women than among men.

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Authors

Ellen Garbarino, Case Western Reserve University
Michal Strahilevitz, University of Arizona



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28 | 2001



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