Special Session Summary a Fuller Understanding of Product and Brand Relationships: Antecedents, Dimensions, and Consequences



Citation:

Julie R. Irwin (2001) ,"Special Session Summary a Fuller Understanding of Product and Brand Relationships: Antecedents, Dimensions, and Consequences", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 42.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 42

SPECIAL SESSION SUMMARY

A FULLER UNDERSTANDING OF PRODUCT AND BRAND RELATIONSHIPS: ANTECEDENTS, DIMENSIONS, AND CONSEQUENCES

Julie R. Irwin, University of Texas at Austin

 

"DIMENSIONING BRAND RELATIONSHIPS USING BRAND RELATIONSHIP QUALITY"

Susan Fournier, Harvard School of Business

In this presentation, Dr. Fournier presented results of the validation of a scale to measure Brand Relationship Quality (BRQ) Ba construct inducted in Fournier (1998) to capture the cognitive, affective, and behavioral dimensions along which consumer-brand relationships vary. Differential effects of six BRQ facets (intimacy, commitment, partner quality, interdependence, love, identity attachment) on a range of relationship outcomes (e.g., tolerance, top-of-mind saliency, resistance, trial of extensions, persistence) were explored, as were the predictive capacity of BRQ in general. The BRQ explains differences in relationship outcomes that are not captured in traditional loyalty or satisfaction measures. Facet profiles were also articulated that capture different relationship "types," thereby advancing knowledge of the differential successes of varying consumer-brand relationship classes.

 

"BRAND RELATIONSHIPS: THE INFLUENCE OF RELATIONSHIP TYPE ON CONSUMER DECISION MAKING STRATEGIES"

Pankaj Aggarwal, University of Chicago

Ann L. McGill, University of Chicago

The authors extended prior work on brand relationships that draws a parallel between how people form relationships with each other in social situations and how they form relationships with brands in a consumption situation. In this presentation, they focused on differences in information processing strategies depending on the type of relationship the customer has with the brand. They looked at two types of relationships, adopting a distinction that has been developed in the social psychology literature between communal relationships, in which concern for a partner’s need is paramount; and exchange relationships, in which a matched benefit is expected back from the partner. The central thesis of the research is that characteristics of brands and brand communication may trigger different relationship types and norms of behavior. They found that these characteristics predict both the type of cognitive processing (e.g., overall effort exerted, the degree of abstractness of considered feature, the use of compensatory vs. noncompensatory decision rules) and the degree of negative affect experienced while choosing between brands.

 

"IF THEY COULD SEE US NOW: A LOOK AT HOW CONSUMERS RELATE TO THEIR PRODUCTS AND HOW THESE RELATIONSHIPS EXPLAIN WHY LEADING BRANDS SUCCEED OR FAIL"

Peter Golder, New York University

Julie Irwin, University of Texas at Austin

The presenters focused on the ability of leading brands to maintain strong relationships with consumers. They addressed two questions: which consumer-brand relationships are enduring and which are fleeting? And, how do we explain these differences? They built on the product and brand relationship literature by proposing a multi-item scale that measures how consumers relate to their products. Then, they extended studies evaluating long-term brand leadership with an extensive data set of brand leaders from the 1920s until today in over 100 categories. They presented findings on the rate of leadership persistence over time. Also, they used their new measures to explain differences in leadership persistence.

 

DISCUSSION

Susan Broniarczk, University of Texas at Austin

The discussion, led by Dr. Broniarczyk, focused on integrating the three papers, with a special emphasis on the ways in which brand relationships may drive category relationships, and vice versa.

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Authors

Julie R. Irwin, University of Texas at Austin



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28 | 2001



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