Child-Brand Relationships: a Conceptual Framework

ABSTRACT - This paper presents a conceptual framework for understanding the formation of child-brand relationships. It first reviews evidence that supports the existence of child-brand relationships and then examines children’s potential to enter such a relationship. This potential is suggested to be a function of children’s motivation, opportunity, and ability (MOA) to form and maintain relationships with brands. Research propositions are posited to explain how children’s age, gender, and social environmental factors (i.e., parents and peers) affect their potential to enter into the relationships. Finally, the paper provides suggestions on how to nurture successful child-brand relationships and discusses some managerial implications.



Citation:

Mindy F. Ji (2001) ,"Child-Brand Relationships: a Conceptual Framework", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 213.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 213

CHILD-BRAND RELATIONSHIPS: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Mindy F. Ji, Texas A&M University

ABSTRACT -

This paper presents a conceptual framework for understanding the formation of child-brand relationships. It first reviews evidence that supports the existence of child-brand relationships and then examines children’s potential to enter such a relationship. This potential is suggested to be a function of children’s motivation, opportunity, and ability (MOA) to form and maintain relationships with brands. Research propositions are posited to explain how children’s age, gender, and social environmental factors (i.e., parents and peers) affect their potential to enter into the relationships. Finally, the paper provides suggestions on how to nurture successful child-brand relationships and discusses some managerial implications.

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Authors

Mindy F. Ji, Texas A&M University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28 | 2001



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