Need For Cognition and the Effects of Repeated Expression on Attitude Accessibility and Extremity

ABSTRACT - An abundance of empirical data supports the notion that an attitude's accessibility is a key determinant of the attitude's likelihood of influencing judgment and behavior (see Fazio, forthcoming, for a review). Repeated expression of an attitude has been shown to enhance attitude accessibility, but recent findings suggest that attitude polarization is another possible consequence of this procedure. We conducted a study to determine if these polarization and accessibility effects might be partially mediated by increases in attitude-relevant thought. Consistent with this reasoning, subjects high in their need for cognition (NFC) showed both greater polarization and greater accessibility increases than did low NFC subjects.



Citation:

Stephen M. Smith, Curtis P. Haugtvedt, and Richard E. Petty (1994) ,"Need For Cognition and the Effects of Repeated Expression on Attitude Accessibility and Extremity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 21, eds. Chris T. Allen and Deborah Roedder John, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 234-237.

Authors

Stephen M. Smith, North Georgia College
Curtis P. Haugtvedt, Ohio State University
Richard E. Petty, Ohio State University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 21 | 1994



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