Interactive Effects of Source Credibility, Attitudinal Discrepancy and Number of Arguments on Attitude Change



Citation:

Jean-Charles Chebat, Michel Laroche, Pierre Filiatrault, and Catherine Watson (1987) ,"Interactive Effects of Source Credibility, Attitudinal Discrepancy and Number of Arguments on Attitude Change", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 14, eds. Melanie Wallendorf and Paul Anderson, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 560.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 14, 1987      Page 560

INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF SOURCE CREDIBILITY, ATTITUDINAL DISCREPANCY AND NUMBER OF ARGUMENTS ON ATTITUDE CHANGE

Jean-Charles Chebat, UQAM

Michel Laroche, Concordia University

Pierre Filiatrault, UQAM

Catherine Watson, Dawson College

This paper explores the interactive effects of three cognitive variables (source perceived competence, recipients' initial attitudes and message number of arguments) on attitudes change. A 2 x 2 x 3 research design (2 levels of competence, 2 levels of arguments' number, 3 levels of initial attitudes) was used (N = 381). Results show no main effects of neither credibility nor the number of arguments. However there is a positive and significant main effect of initial attitudes on attitude change. There are significant interactive effects of initial attitudes and credibility (lower credibility induces more attitude change from the opposed group); there are also significant interactive effects of initial attitudes and number of arguments (number of arguments is effective when initial attitudes are neutral). Expected and unexpected results contribute to a global model of persuasion.

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Authors

Jean-Charles Chebat, UQAM
Michel Laroche, Concordia University
Pierre Filiatrault, UQAM
Catherine Watson, Dawson College



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 14 | 1987



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