Determinants of Product Value-Expressiveness

A study was conducted testing the hypothesis that product value-expressiveness is a function of product conspicuousness, differentiation, and common usage. A 3-way repeated measures ANOVA design was used representing the effects of the three factors on value expressiveness. Eight products representing the eight cells in the repeated measures design were selected. Manipulation checks showed that the products did indeed represent conspicuousness, differentiation, and common usage. As expected, the ANOVA results showed three significant main effects and no interaction effects. That is, conspicuousness, differentiation, and common usage were found to significantly contribute to the predicted variance in value expressiveness. This finding was argued to be instrumental in developing future reliable and valid product value-expressiveness measures to be employed in consumer self-concept research.



Citation:

M. Joseph Sirgy, J. S. Johar, and Michael Wood (1986) ,"Determinants of Product Value-Expressiveness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 671.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 671

DETERMINANTS OF PRODUCT VALUE-EXPRESSIVENESS

M. Joseph Sirgy, Virginia Tech

J. S. Johar, Cal State U San Bernandino

Michael Wood, CUNY, Hunter College

A study was conducted testing the hypothesis that product value-expressiveness is a function of product conspicuousness, differentiation, and common usage. A 3-way repeated measures ANOVA design was used representing the effects of the three factors on value expressiveness. Eight products representing the eight cells in the repeated measures design were selected. Manipulation checks showed that the products did indeed represent conspicuousness, differentiation, and common usage. As expected, the ANOVA results showed three significant main effects and no interaction effects. That is, conspicuousness, differentiation, and common usage were found to significantly contribute to the predicted variance in value expressiveness. This finding was argued to be instrumental in developing future reliable and valid product value-expressiveness measures to be employed in consumer self-concept research.

For further information, write to

Professor M. Joseph Sirgy / Department of Marketing / Virginia Tech / Blacksburg, VA 24061

----------------------------------------

Authors

M. Joseph Sirgy, Virginia Tech
J. S. Johar, Cal State U San Bernandino
Michael Wood, CUNY, Hunter College



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13 | 1986



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