Retail Patronage Behavior

ABSTRACT - Consumers' choice of the purchasing place has several impacts on the surroundings, retailers and civil servants. In this study consumers' purchases are examined by developing a framework to describe and explain patronage behavior in alternative areas. Distance between two areas explains a part of this shopping movement, but the reasons of the other part should be explored to understand the total phenomenon, Store image and area image are the main components of the developed framework. After two mailings the whole data set consisted of 1015 questionnaires representing 17 z of all families in the town. The analysis of variance was used to reveal the connections between different components. Results indicate that consumers' perceptions of stores and areas ( image ) have significant effects on purchases of different products. Negative perceptions have greater effects than positive. This would imply more like " pushing out " than attracting a trading area. This is useful empirical support for retailers.



Citation:

Maija Rokman (1986) ,"Retail Patronage Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 671.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 671

RETAIL PATRONAGE BEHAVIOR

Maija Rokman, University of Tampere

ABSTRACT -

Consumers' choice of the purchasing place has several impacts on the surroundings, retailers and civil servants. In this study consumers' purchases are examined by developing a framework to describe and explain patronage behavior in alternative areas. Distance between two areas explains a part of this shopping movement, but the reasons of the other part should be explored to understand the total phenomenon, Store image and area image are the main components of the developed framework. After two mailings the whole data set consisted of 1015 questionnaires representing 17 z of all families in the town. The analysis of variance was used to reveal the connections between different components. Results indicate that consumers' perceptions of stores and areas ( image ) have significant effects on purchases of different products. Negative perceptions have greater effects than positive. This would imply more like " pushing out " than attracting a trading area. This is useful empirical support for retailers.

For further information, write to:

Maija Rokman, L.Sc.(Econ.) / Department of Business Economics and Business Law / University of Tampere / P.O.Box 607, 33101 Tampere 10, FINLAND

----------------------------------------

Authors

Maija Rokman, University of Tampere



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13 | 1986



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