Social Adaptation Theory in Consumer Behavior

ABSTRACT - Social adaptation theory applies neo-Piagetian concepts to such content areas as attitude change and advertising effectiveness. The theory assumes that schemata grow as a result of dynamic adaptation through assimilation and accommodation, as well as through internal organization of information. Adaptation rather than rationality animates change. This paper elaborates on the theory, compares and contrasts it with other, competing theories, and describes applications of the theory in the research areas of advertising effectiveness, attitude-behavior consistency, self concept, values, and philosophy of science.



Citation:

Lynn R. Kahle, Pamela M. Homer, and Sharon E. Beatty (1986) ,"Social Adaptation Theory in Consumer Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 667.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 667

SOCIAL ADAPTATION THEORY IN CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Lynn R. Kahle, University of Oregon

Pamela M. Homer, University of Oregon

Sharon E. Beatty, University of Oregon

ABSTRACT -

Social adaptation theory applies neo-Piagetian concepts to such content areas as attitude change and advertising effectiveness. The theory assumes that schemata grow as a result of dynamic adaptation through assimilation and accommodation, as well as through internal organization of information. Adaptation rather than rationality animates change. This paper elaborates on the theory, compares and contrasts it with other, competing theories, and describes applications of the theory in the research areas of advertising effectiveness, attitude-behavior consistency, self concept, values, and philosophy of science.

For further information, write to:

Lynn R. Kahle / 388 Gilbert Hall / University of Oregon / Eugene, Oregon 97403-1208

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Authors

Lynn R. Kahle, University of Oregon
Pamela M. Homer, University of Oregon
Sharon E. Beatty, University of Oregon



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13 | 1986



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