Mental Imagery Vividness in Marketing Communication

ABSTRACT - This study explored how individual ability in mental representation interacts with presentation modality to affect belief strength and accuracy of recall. Experiments were conducted with health care consumers at a major urban medical center. The same imaginal information was presented in four different modes, i. e., audio, visual, audiovisual and audiokinesthetic. The findings expand our knowledge about imaginal processing First, imagery vividness was a multidimensional construct by sense. That is, imagery vividness by sense was associated with response outputs, while imagery vividness aggregated across the senses was not useful for evaluating imagery effects. Second, the effects of imagery vividness varied according to type of cognitive response, i. e., belief strength versus accuracy of recall. Third, imagery vividness interacted with presentation modality. The results emphasize the importance of studying imaginal processing in separate senses, suggest that processing among the senses may interact in identifiable ways, and provide direction about how to design, package and communicate information.



Citation:

Evelyn Gutman (1986) ,"Mental Imagery Vividness in Marketing Communication", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 665.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 665

MENTAL IMAGERY VIVIDNESS IN MARKETING COMMUNICATION

Evelyn Gutman, Boston University

ABSTRACT -

This study explored how individual ability in mental representation interacts with presentation modality to affect belief strength and accuracy of recall. Experiments were conducted with health care consumers at a major urban medical center. The same imaginal information was presented in four different modes, i. e., audio, visual, audiovisual and audiokinesthetic. The findings expand our knowledge about imaginal processing First, imagery vividness was a multidimensional construct by sense. That is, imagery vividness by sense was associated with response outputs, while imagery vividness aggregated across the senses was not useful for evaluating imagery effects. Second, the effects of imagery vividness varied according to type of cognitive response, i. e., belief strength versus accuracy of recall. Third, imagery vividness interacted with presentation modality. The results emphasize the importance of studying imaginal processing in separate senses, suggest that processing among the senses may interact in identifiable ways, and provide direction about how to design, package and communicate information.

For further information, write to:

Professor Evelyn Gutman / Boston University / 621 Commonwealth Avenue / Boston, Massachusetts 02215

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Authors

Evelyn Gutman, Boston University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13 | 1986



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