Living in Glass Houses: the Effect of Transparent Products on Self-Presentation

Transparent products have recently become fashionable and sometimes required. Yet, what effect might they have on consumers? On the one hand, they might trigger an illusion of transparency, causing consumers to be more honest. On the other hand, they might heighten impression management. Four studies test these possibilities.



Citation:

Ann Schlosser and Evelyn Smith (2020) ,"Living in Glass Houses: the Effect of Transparent Products on Self-Presentation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 525-526.

Authors

Ann Schlosser, University of Washington, USA
Evelyn Smith, University of Washington, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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