Say Cheese Or Not?

This research examines the interaction between smile intensity and status rank. Across four empirical studies, it indicates that a broader smile leads to favorable (unfavorable) impressions and higher (lower) compliance when associated with a lower (higher) social status. These observed effects are driven by perceived consistency with consumers’ emotion decodes.



Citation:

Ruomeng Wu, Meng Liu, Ze Wang, and Ming-Shen (Cony) Ho (2020) ,"Say Cheese Or Not?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 690-692.

Authors

Ruomeng Wu, Western Kentucky University
Meng Liu, Independent Researcher
Ze Wang, University of Central Florida, USA
Ming-Shen (Cony) Ho, Clemson University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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