Why Consumers Disproportionately Invest to Improve Outcomes That Are Already Favorable

Are people more willing to improve worse outcomes (e.g. a $20 gain to $30) or better outcomes (e.g. a $70 gain to $80)? In contrast to what diminishing sensitivity would predict, I find that people usually improve the better outcome. I offer a theory to explain why.



Citation:

Joshua Lewis (2020) ,"Why Consumers Disproportionately Invest to Improve Outcomes That Are Already Favorable", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 497-499.

Authors

Joshua Lewis, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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