When Products Are People: the Impact of Anthropomorphism on Recycling

Four studies investigate the effect of anthropomorphism on recycling. Making a product humanlike increases its likelihood of being recycled. However, when recycling requires that consumers disassemble the product, anthropomorphism backfires, reducing recycling.



Citation:

Alisa Yinghao Wu, Maayan Malter, and Gita Venkataramani Johar (2020) ,"When Products Are People: the Impact of Anthropomorphism on Recycling", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1043-1047.

Authors

Alisa Yinghao Wu, Columbia University, USA
Maayan Malter, Columbia University, USA
Gita Venkataramani Johar, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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