Does Appearance Reveal Character? Lay Theories of Physiognomy Influence Consumers' Willingness to Buy Imperfect Produce

Twenty billion pounds of produce goes to waste every year — largely attributed to atypical appearance. Eight studies in the lab and field find that consumers’ lay belief about whether people’s appearance reveals their character shapes their willingness to buy ugly produce. We rule out alternative explanations and propose multiple interventions.



Citation:

Shilpa Madan, Krishna Savani, and Gita Venkataramani Johar (2020) ,"Does Appearance Reveal Character? Lay Theories of Physiognomy Influence Consumers' Willingness to Buy Imperfect Produce", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1043-1047.

Authors

Shilpa Madan, Virginia Tech, USA
Krishna Savani, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Gita Venkataramani Johar, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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