Do Happiness and Meaning in Life Uniquely Predict Consumer Well-Being?

We tested the influence of happiness and, separately, meaning on consumer well-being once their overlapping variance was removed. Two studies testing life views, psychological needs, and interpersonal outcomes indicated that happiness was a stronger predictor than meaning — thereby suggesting doubts about the influence of meaning on well-being.



Citation:

Xianyu Hao and Kathleen Vohs (2020) ,"Do Happiness and Meaning in Life Uniquely Predict Consumer Well-Being?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1221-1221.

Authors

Xianyu Hao, University of Minnesota, USA
Kathleen Vohs, University of Minnesota, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Names Are the Mirrors of the Soul: The Role of Possessive Brand Names in Brand Evaluations

Marina Puzakova, Lehigh University
Mansur Khamitov, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Read More

Featured

Effortful but Valuable: How Perceptions of Effort Affect Charitable Gift Choice and Valuations of Charity

Haesung Annie Jung, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Marlone Henderson, University of Texas at Austin, USA

Read More

Featured

Q4. The notion of self-optimization in context of self-tracking and beyond

Agnieszka Krzeminska, Leuphana University Lüneburg
Dorthe Brogård Kristensen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.