Understanding and Reducing the Spread of Misinformation Online

Why do people share misinformation, and what can be done about it? Across survey experiments and a Twitter field experiment, we find inducing people to think about the accuracy increases the quality of the news they share. This suggests the problem is distraction and offers a scalable anti-misinformation intervention.



Citation:

Gordon Pennycook, Ziv Epstein, Mohsen Mosleh, Antonio Arechar, Dean Eckles, and David Rand (2020) ,"Understanding and Reducing the Spread of Misinformation Online", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 863-867.

Authors

Gordon Pennycook, University of Regina, Canada
Ziv Epstein, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Mohsen Mosleh, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Antonio Arechar, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Dean Eckles, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
David Rand, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

D1. When Intention to Share on Social Media Increases Variety-Seeking: The Role of Self-Enhancement

Jingjing Ma, Peking University
David Dubois, INSEAD, France
Fei Jin, Peking University

Read More

Featured

The Effects of Breadth of Product Categories on Budgeting

An Tran, University of La Verne
John Lynch, University of Colorado, USA

Read More

Featured

Green Experiences: Using Green Products Improves the Accompanying Consumption Experience

Ali Tezer, HEC Montreal, Canada
H. Onur Bodur, Concordia University, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.