Disclosure of Positive and Negative Experiences As Social Utility

We propose that disclosing one’s positive and negative experiences carries social utility for both senders and recipients. We show that consumers consider this utility when deciding whether to disclose their experiences with others. In three preregistered studies, consumers respond in kind to the disclosures of positive and negative experiences by others.



Citation:

Emily Prinsloo, Irene Scopelliti, Joachim Vosgerau, and George Loewenstein (2020) ,"Disclosure of Positive and Negative Experiences As Social Utility", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 596-597.

Authors

Emily Prinsloo, Harvard Business School, USA
Irene Scopelliti, City University of London, UK
Joachim Vosgerau, Bocconi University, Italy
George Loewenstein, Carnegie Mellon University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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