The Disproportional Effects of Negative Information on Female Brands

We investigate how negative information has disproportionate effects on attitudes toward female brands and such attitude is mediated by change in trust on female brands. We conducted three studies to test this prediction. Study 1 utilized a dataset from Yelp.com and the rest was experiments. The results confirm our predictions.



Citation:

Tim Ozcan, Ahmet M Hattat, Michael Hair, and Daniel A. Sheinin (2020) ,"The Disproportional Effects of Negative Information on Female Brands", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 570-573.

Authors

Tim Ozcan, James Madison University, USA
Ahmet M Hattat, Lawrence Tech University
Michael Hair, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Daniel A. Sheinin, University of Rhode Island, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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