Guilty Pleasures: Consumers Choosing Identity Conflicting Behaviors

We examine a real-world phenomenon where consumers knowingly and repeatedly act in an identity conflicting way for their own personal pleasure— guilty pleasures. Four experiments (n=~1000) demonstrate how guilty pleasures are behaviors that individuals choose to engage in even though they report identifying with the behaviors less than other behaviors.



Citation:

Nikkita Sarna and Susan Broniarczyk (2020) ,"Guilty Pleasures: Consumers Choosing Identity Conflicting Behaviors", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1191-1191.

Authors

Nikkita Sarna, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Susan Broniarczyk, University of Texas at Austin, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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