Emotionality and Language Norms in Consumer Reviews: the Curious Case of Emoji

How do emoji impact the persuasiveness of consumer reviews? We argue that effects of emoji in reviews are stronger for utilitarian than hedonic products. Two experiments show that effects of emoji on persuasion are consistent with an account based on emoji as a language rather than as markers of emotionality.



Citation:

Polina Landgraf, Nicholas Lurie, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, and Susan Danissa Calderon Urbina (2020) ,"Emotionality and Language Norms in Consumer Reviews: the Curious Case of Emoji", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1226-1226.

Authors

Polina Landgraf, IE Business School, IE University, Spain
Nicholas Lurie, University of Connecticut, USA
Antonios Stamatogiannakis, IE Business School, IE University, Spain
Susan Danissa Calderon Urbina, University College Dublin, Ireland



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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