Emotionality and Language Norms in Consumer Reviews: the Curious Case of Emoji

How do emoji impact the persuasiveness of consumer reviews? We argue that effects of emoji in reviews are stronger for utilitarian than hedonic products. Two experiments show that effects of emoji on persuasion are consistent with an account based on emoji as a language rather than as markers of emotionality.



Citation:

Polina Landgraf, Nicholas Lurie, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, and Susan Danissa Calderon Urbina (2020) ,"Emotionality and Language Norms in Consumer Reviews: the Curious Case of Emoji", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1226-1226.

Authors

Polina Landgraf, IE Business School, IE University, Spain
Nicholas Lurie, University of Connecticut, USA
Antonios Stamatogiannakis, IE Business School, IE University, Spain
Susan Danissa Calderon Urbina, University College Dublin, Ireland



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

N5. Mixed Feelings, Mixed Baskets: How Emotions of Pride and Guilt Drive the Relative Healthiness of Sequential Food Choices

Julia Storch, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Koert van Ittersum, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Jing Wan, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Read More

Featured

Preferences for Insight and Effort Differ across Domains and Audiences

Gaetano Nino Miceli, University of Calabria
Irene Scopelliti, City University of London, UK
Maria Antonietta Raimondo, University of Calabria

Read More

Featured

Q6. Online Social Status Predicts Subjective Well-being: a Two Population Study

Rui Du, University of Hawaii, USA
Miao Hu, University of Hawaii, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.