Perceived Drivers of Change in Financial Well-Being Predict Partisan Lean and Response to Policy Messages

Consumers’ lay theories concerning how financial well-being changes over time vary along three independent dimensions: (1) knowable and controllable (‘rewarding’); (2) knowable and not controllable (‘rigged’); (3) inherently unpredictable (‘random’). Individual differences on these dimensions predict political preferences and responses to redistributional policy messages that are framed in different ways.



Citation:

Job M. T. Krijnen, Jon Bogard, Gulden Ulkumen, and Craig Fox (2020) ,"Perceived Drivers of Change in Financial Well-Being Predict Partisan Lean and Response to Policy Messages", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 943-948.

Authors

Job M. T. Krijnen, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Jon Bogard, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Gulden Ulkumen, University of Southern California, USA
Craig Fox, University of California Los Angeles, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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