Meaning Comes Cheap: the Pursuit of Meaning and the Preference For Low Price Options

Consumers believe that meaningful products should be long-lasting (Percival Carter and Williams 2020). Yet, when they actually pursue meaning (vs. pleasure) in consumption, consumers “cheap out” by choosing less expensive, lower quality products. This effect is explained by an increased focus on opportunity costs when pursuing meaning (vs. pleasure).



Citation:

Nicole L. Mead and Lawrence E Williams (2020) ,"Meaning Comes Cheap: the Pursuit of Meaning and the Preference For Low Price Options", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1006-1010.

Authors

Nicole L. Mead, York University, Canada
Lawrence E Williams, University of Colorado, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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