Can Brands Be Sarcastic? the Effect of Sarcastic Responses on Attitudes Towards Activist Messages

When brands address controversial activist messages, some consumers feel offended, triggering uncivil responses on social media platforms. How do brands reply to such rudeness maintaining its conviction and simultaneously ensuring its reputation? In six experiments we demonstrate that humor and aggression (sarcasm) should not come together in brand activist reactions.



Citation:

Juliana M. Batista, Lucia Salmonson Guimarães Barros, Fabricia Volotão Peixoto, and Delane Botelho (2020) ,"Can Brands Be Sarcastic? the Effect of Sarcastic Responses on Attitudes Towards Activist Messages", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 207-208.

Authors

Juliana M. Batista, EAESP-FGV, Brazil
Lucia Salmonson Guimarães Barros, FGV-EAESP, Brazil
Fabricia Volotão Peixoto, EAESP-FGV, Brazil
Delane Botelho, EAESP-FGV, Brazil



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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