Exploring the Payday Effect: Anxiety Before Payday Leads to Overspending

While standard economic theory suggests that individuals spending should not change in response to regular income, research shows that individuals spend more following a payday. Using both real transaction data and experiments, this work demonstrates that anxiety leads individuals to construe their income as a windfall leading to overspending.



Citation:

Laura Goodyear, Chuck Howard, Marcel Lukas, and Avni Shah (2020) ,"Exploring the Payday Effect: Anxiety Before Payday Leads to Overspending", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 372-373.

Authors

Laura Goodyear, University of Toronto, Canada
Chuck Howard, Texas A&M University, USA
Marcel Lukas, University of St Andrews
Avni Shah, University of Toronto, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

When Does Being Paid an Hourly Wage Make it Difficult to Be a Happy Volunteer?

Sanford E. DeVoe, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Jieun Pai, University of California Los Angeles, USA

Read More

Featured

Repeat Performances Decrease Consumer Perceptions of Authenticity

Rachel Gershon, Washington University, USA
Rosanna Smith, University of Georgia, USA

Read More

Featured

Felt Ambivalence: Exploring the Storage Structure and Role of Situational Relevance on the Accessibility of Dominant and Conflicting Reactions

Amit Surendra Singh, Ohio State University, USA
H. Rao Unnava, University of California, Davis

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.