Unintentional Inception: Why Unintentionality Increases Quality Perceptions of Artistic Products

Product creation can be fundamentally intended or unintended from its outset, but does intentionality in a product’s inception influence perception? Across numerous artistic products we find that consumers perceive unintentional creations as higher quality, driven by increased counterfactual thought about how a product’s creation may never have occurred at all.



Citation:

Alexander Goldklank Fulmer and Taly Reich (2020) ,"Unintentional Inception: Why Unintentionality Increases Quality Perceptions of Artistic Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1032-1037.

Authors

Alexander Goldklank Fulmer, Yale University, USA
Taly Reich, Yale University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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