The “Next” Effect

Participants interacted with the same novel technologies, but some were informed beforehand that even better versions were allegedly in the works. Mere awareness of better future versions undermined enjoyment for present versions (despite being brand new for participants), by spurring participants to go looking for, and alas find, more flaws.



Citation:

Ed O'Brien (2020) ,"The “Next” Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1032-1037.

Authors

Ed O'Brien, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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