When More Is Less: How Rejecting (Vs. Selecting) Food Ingredients Leads to Lower Estimates of Calories

Integrating research on decision frames and nutritional evaluation, the authors propose and demonstrate that eliminating (vs. selecting) ingredients increases leads to lower estimates of calories. Furthermore, this affects evaluations of the retailer and their subsequent food choices.



Citation:

Ali Besharat, Marisabel Romero, and Kelly Haws (2020) ,"When More Is Less: How Rejecting (Vs. Selecting) Food Ingredients Leads to Lower Estimates of Calories", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1160-1164.

Authors

Ali Besharat, University of Denver, USA
Marisabel Romero, Colorado State University, USA
Kelly Haws, Vanderbilt University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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