“Swipe Left For No”: Why Options That Survive Rejection Lead to Greater Purchase

We propose that explicitly rejecting options (e.g., “swipe left”) during a sequential evaluation heightens evaluation closure over the options, increasing purchase likelihood from the “rejection survivors.” Four studies test the difference between options identified through explicit rejection and implicit rejection, and implications are discussed with respect to new evaluation modes.



Citation:

Jen H. Park and Itamar Simonson (2020) ,"“Swipe Left For No”: Why Options That Survive Rejection Lead to Greater Purchase", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1160-1164.

Authors

Jen H. Park, Stanford University, USA
Itamar Simonson, Stanford University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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