How Estimating One’S Minimum Or Maximum Spend Affects Total Expected Expenditure on a Shopping Trip

We investigate the effect of considering one’s possible minimum and/or maximum spend on the expected total spend during a grocery shopping trip. We propose that considering one’s maximum will increase the effect of unpacking on magnitude estimation while consideration of the minimum spend will decrease the effect.



Citation:

Eunha Han, Harmen Oppewal, Eugene Chan, and Luke Greenacre (2020) ,"How Estimating One’S Minimum Or Maximum Spend Affects Total Expected Expenditure on a Shopping Trip", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1231-1231.

Authors

Eunha Han, Monash University, Australia
Harmen Oppewal, Monash University, Australia
Eugene Chan, Monash University, Australia
Luke Greenacre, Monash University, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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