The Costs of Autonomy: Decisional Autonomy Undermines Advisees’ Judgments of Experts

In contrast to advisers’ expectations, across 6 experiments (N=3,867) we find that advisers who give advisees decisional autonomy rather than paternalistic advice are judged to be less competent, less helpful, and are less likely to be recommended. We document these effects in the context of medical, financial, and workplace advice.



Citation:

Samantha Kassirer, Emma Levine, and Celia Gaertig (2020) ,"The Costs of Autonomy: Decisional Autonomy Undermines Advisees’ Judgments of Experts", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 958-962.

Authors

Samantha Kassirer, Northwestern University, USA
Emma Levine, University of Chicago, USA
Celia Gaertig, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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