The Objectivity Illusion of Ranking Procedures: How and Why Ranking Alleviates Decision Difficulty

This research examines how two prominent preference-elicitation modes (choice and rank-ordering) impact consumers’ decision difficulty. Although one would expect a rank-ordering procedure (vs. choice), to elicit greater difficulty, we consistently find the opposite. Ranking options increases perceived decision objectivity and, consequently, reduces decision difficulty.



Citation:

Yonat Zwebner and Rom Schrift (2020) ,"The Objectivity Illusion of Ranking Procedures: How and Why Ranking Alleviates Decision Difficulty", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1175-1180.

Authors

Yonat Zwebner, The InterDisciplinary Center (IDC( Herzliya
Rom Schrift, Indiana University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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