How to Convince Consumers That “You Do Not Always Get What You Pay For”

Findings of three studies showed that provoking suspicion could eliminate consumers’ reliance on price to judge quality. Furthermore, findings showed that activating persuasion knowledge is likely to result in a schematic thinking style, a greater primacy effect of the readily available information, and higher price-quality perceptions.



Citation:

Vahid Rahmani and Elika Kordrostami (2020) ,"How to Convince Consumers That “You Do Not Always Get What You Pay For”", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1193-1193.

Authors

Vahid Rahmani, Rowan University, USA
Elika Kordrostami, Rowan University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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