When Limits Backfire: the Ironic Effect of Setting Limits on Entertainment Consumption

To better manage their time, consumers often set costless, non-binding limits for how long to spend on entertaining activities, like social media and games. Five pre-registered experiments show that setting such limits can backfire, increasing, rather than decreasing, the time spent on such activities at the expense of paid work.



Citation:

Shalena Srna, Jackie Silverman, and Jordan Etkin (2020) ,"When Limits Backfire: the Ironic Effect of Setting Limits on Entertainment Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1101-1105.

Authors

Shalena Srna, University of Michigan, USA
Jackie Silverman, University of Delaware, USA
Jordan Etkin, Duke University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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