Consumer Knowledge and the Psychology of Opposition to Scientific Consensus

Communicating scientific evidence is a major challenge. We report three studies on the relationships between knowledge type and anti-scientific attitudes across seven scientific issues. We find that as extremity of attitudes increases, objective knowledge decreases, but subjective knowledge increases. However, several issues show inconsistencies worthy of further examination.



Citation:

Nicholas Light and Philip M. Fernbach (2020) ,"Consumer Knowledge and the Psychology of Opposition to Scientific Consensus", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1223-1223.

Authors

Nicholas Light, University of Colorado, USA
Philip M. Fernbach, University of Colorado, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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