How Power Influences the Use of Humor

We demonstrate that humor is fundamentally tied to power. By analyzing 73,620 emails, we find that humor is more frequently used by higher power individuals than low power individuals. By experimentally manipulating power, we find that low power individuals are less able to create humor than high power individuals.



Citation:

Brad Bitterly (2020) ,"How Power Influences the Use of Humor", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 930-935.

Authors

Brad Bitterly, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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