What I Like Is What I Remember: Memory Modulation in Preferential Choice

Do memory processes in decision making differ from those in pure-memory tasks? Computational memory models fit to empirical data show that while some established memory regularities (e.g. primacy and semantic/temporal clustering) persist, other decision-specific factors, such as item desirability, play a stronger role in guiding retrieval in decision tasks.



Citation:

Ada Aka and Sudeep Bhatia (2020) ,"What I Like Is What I Remember: Memory Modulation in Preferential Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1139-1143.

Authors

Ada Aka, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Sudeep Bhatia, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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