Food Sharing Reduces Perceived Consequences of Caloric Intake

Food sharing has been a growing trend in the United States, promoted by companies as a means of portion control. In contrast to this assertion, three experiments show that food sharing is reducing perceived consequences of caloric intake (i.e., fattening judgments), which increases caloric intake in subsequent consumption episodes.



Citation:

Nükhet Taylor and Theodore J. Noseworthy (2020) ,"Food Sharing Reduces Perceived Consequences of Caloric Intake", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 730-731.

Authors

Nükhet Taylor, York University, Canada
Theodore J. Noseworthy, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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