Food Sharing Reduces Perceived Consequences of Caloric Intake

Food sharing has been a growing trend in the United States, promoted by companies as a means of portion control. In contrast to this assertion, three experiments show that food sharing is reducing perceived consequences of caloric intake (i.e., fattening judgments), which increases caloric intake in subsequent consumption episodes.



Citation:

Nükhet Taylor and Theodore J. Noseworthy (2020) ,"Food Sharing Reduces Perceived Consequences of Caloric Intake", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 730-731.

Authors

Nükhet Taylor, York University, Canada
Theodore J. Noseworthy, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

N13. Smaller Self but Larger Tips? The Effect of Awe on Consumers’ Tipping Intention

Ran Li, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

Read More

Featured

L13. The Recipient Effect on Consumers’ Preference for Products Displayed in Different Horizontal Locations

Sheng Bi, Washington State University, USA
Nik Nikolov, Washington State University, USA
Julio Sevilla, University of Georgia, USA

Read More

Featured

Turning “Expenses” into “Bills”: How spending Categorization Impacts Budget Optimism and Likelihood of Success

Eleanor Putnam-Farr, Rice University, USA
Anastasiya Pocheptsova Ghosh, University of Arizona, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.