Are You Paying Attention? Consumption-Related Antecedents and Consequences of the Spotlight Effect

I extend spotlight effect research by demonstrating that the attention consumers receive online (e.g., views, likes, etc.) influences their spotlight biases offline. Further, I resolve conflicting findings on the consumption-related consequences of the spotlight bias by demonstrating the effect of this bias on conspicuous consumption depends on consumers’ regulatory focus.



Citation:

Matthew James Hall (2020) ,"Are You Paying Attention? Consumption-Related Antecedents and Consequences of the Spotlight Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 383-384.

Authors

Matthew James Hall, Oregon State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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