It Is Better to Be Unknown Than Known: Mixed Use of Less Known and Well-Known Luxury Brands Can Elicit Higher Status Inference

Across four studies, we find that mixed use of less known and well-known brands compared to use of all well-known or all less known brands increases perceived status when well-known brands are in luxury(vs. non-luxury) domain. This is because observers infer user's desire to dissociate from lower class luxury users.



Citation:

Min Jeong Ko and Kyoungmi Lee (2020) ,"It Is Better to Be Unknown Than Known: Mixed Use of Less Known and Well-Known Luxury Brands Can Elicit Higher Status Inference", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1215-1215.

Authors

Min Jeong Ko, Seoul National University, South Korea
Kyoungmi Lee, Seoul National University, South Korea



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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