Political Polarization in How Perceived Social Similarity Impacts Support For Redistribution

The literature presumes that boosting similarity should boost support for redistributive policies that reduce economic inequality. But the effect of social similarity may be more complex. Perceiving high (vs. low) social similarity increases liberals’, but lowers conservatives’, redistribution support, because it weakens liberals’, but strengthens conservatives’, justification of unequal outcomes.



Citation:

Nailya Ordabayeva (2020) ,"Political Polarization in How Perceived Social Similarity Impacts Support For Redistribution", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 936-935.

Authors

Nailya Ordabayeva, Boston College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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