Self-Other Differences in the Perceived Efficacy of Self-Enhancement Products

We tested if judgments of self-enhancement products’ efficacy differ according to whether a product user is the self or someone else. In two pre-registered studies, we found that people believe that self-enhancement products will be more efficacious for others than for themselves, and that usership moderates this self-other difference.



Citation:

Kaiyang Wu and Evan Polman (2020) ,"Self-Other Differences in the Perceived Efficacy of Self-Enhancement Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1194-1194.

Authors

Kaiyang Wu, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Evan Polman, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

A Meta-Analysis on the Endowment Effect in Experiments

DANIEL SUN, University of Calgary, Canada

Read More

Featured

E12. Green versus Premium Choice and Feelings of Pride

Cecilia Souto Maior, Federal University of Paraná
Danielle Mantovani, Federal University of Paraná
Rafael Demczuk, Federal University of Paraná

Read More

Featured

B10. Wearing V Neck, Getting More Trust: An Evolutionary Psychology Approach to Examine the Effect of Collar Style on Trust

jialiang xu, University of Manitoba, Canada
Fang Wan, University of Manitoba, Canada
chenbo zhong, University of Toronto, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.